Working at Heights: 11 Safety Tips

At what height do you need a working at heights ticket?
  • Use Railing. When you can, use railing. …
  • Select the Proper PPE. …
  • Inspect Your PPE. …
  • Ensure You Understand Fall Distance. …
  • Select an Acceptable Anchor Point. …
  • Use the Proper Equipment for Working at Heights (Scaffold vs Lift vs Ladder) …
  • Ensure Proper Use of Aerial Lifts. …
  • Use Ladders Properly.

Work at Height Safety Tips

What does it mean to work at heights?

Working at heights entails the possibility of a fall from a certain height that could result in personal injury. Working on a roof, from a ladder, on a raised platform, outside, close to a window, or even in close proximity to a hole in the ground, such as a sewer or construction site, may fall under this category. It’s important to follow company and general safety guidelines before performing your work tasks from any height because working at heights is regarded as a risk in the workplace.

11 working at heights tips

Follow these guidelines to stay safe at work while completing your tasks on time:

Assess your environment

It’s important to evaluate your workspace before beginning any work at the job site to learn more about your potential hazards and how you should behave to prevent yourself and those around you from getting hurt. You might think about enlisting a peer’s assistance or choosing the tools you require to have the best chance of remaining safe.

Complete safety training

Every workplace needs safety training, but those that require working from heights especially need it. To ensure that all employees are well-versed in how to perform their tasks safely and respond to any emergency they experience, your employer will probably provide safety training as part of your new hire orientation as well as at regular intervals throughout your employment. Attend the trainings your company provides, and you might even want to consider getting your own to round out your knowledge.

Wear personal protective equipment

Consider asking your employer to provide the necessary PPE you require to perform your job if, after assessing the job site, you find that you require more equipment to feel comfortable with your task than you do. In order to stay safe, determine whether you require a specific personal fall arrest system (PFAS), such as one that is fireproof or has additional tools attached, and request these items if necessary. In addition to any other equipment you might use for work, you might also need safety glasses or face shields.

Perform regular inspection of your PPE

It’s possible that your PPE has been in use for a number of months or even years, so it’s important to inspect it before use. Ask a more capable team member to inspect your equipment if they are available if they are more qualified to do so. It doesn’t have to take long, and it’s always preferable to have multiple perspectives on the equipment’s safety.

Select an appropriate anchor point

The weight of the objects you are raising or lowering, as well as your own weight, should be supported by your anchor point. Your anchor points will be the things that can keep you steady so you can complete your task and safely descend to the ground once you’re finished. If you need help choosing the best anchor point on your job site, think about consulting an engineer. Examine your work area to see if there are any beams or other structures you can attach to.

Use lifts properly

Proper lift operations can vary depending on your industry and the type of work you’re doing. If you need assistance understanding how to operate the specific lift you need to work on, ask your manager or an on-site engineer. For the fall distance you’re working with, lifts should offer a solid anchor point. Make sure you are operating all structures in accordance with any safety regulations applicable to your industry and the associated equipment by reading them.

Calculate your fall distance

Knowing the fall distance will help you choose the right safety equipment to keep you safe in the event of a fall. Choose the safety gear, such as lanyards and deceleration aids, that will allow you to work at the height necessary. Take into account your height, the distance you will fall, sags in your equipment, including your harness, and the length of your lanyard.

Use guardrails

If you don’t have a harness, you can still take additional safety measures like using guardrails to stay safe at different heights. Guardrails have the advantage of providing an additional layer of protection, which will make you feel secure in your work and confident that you can complete the task as requested if you stay within the railing.

Know what to do if someone falls

If you fall or someone close to you falls, your employer probably has a set of procedures you should follow. Be sure to be very familiar with these procedures. You should probably contact the relevant authorities and submit an incident report with the date, the specifics of the accident, and any damage to the workplace that you observed. If you were the one who fell, you might need to file for workers’ compensation and seek immediate medical attention.

Work with a peer

There are some tasks you may have to complete, and you might feel more at ease doing them with a coworker by your side. Working alone can be riskier, especially in certain circumstances, so think about asking a peer or manager for help. If you fall, they can help you get the assistance you need and assist you with your specific task.

FAQ

What is the best control method for working at heights?

Working at heights: Hierarchy of control
  1. Avoid working at height completely. …
  2. Prevent falls using a safe place to carry out work.
  3. Prevent falls using collective equipment. …
  4. Use personal protective equipment (PPE): Fall restraint. …
  5. Minimise the distance the worker could fall. …
  6. Minimise the impact of a fall. …
  7. Use PPE: Fall arrest.

What are the 10 safety tips?

The 2019 Top Ten Safety Tips
  • Use tools and machines properly. …
  • Be aware of your surroundings. …
  • Be safe in the cold weather. …
  • Follow procedure, don’t take shortcuts. …
  • Wear your protective gear. …
  • If you see unsafe conditions, let a supervisor know. …
  • Take breaks. …
  • Stay sober.

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