What kind of interview questions do they ask at the Jet Propulsion Lab?

There is a lot of discussion about what it’s like to work at large tech firms, but not much is said about hidden gems like NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Most people swoon over the prospect of working for a company because of the “amazing” perks they offer, like free food and ping pong tables. People work at NASA JPL because they are genuinely passionate about understanding what is happening in space and on Earth, not because of the benefits. This results in a culture that prioritizes ingenuity and exploration.

I used to be an intern at JPL and am currently working on the Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System doing frontend work. I want to get you excited about working with space technologies with this post.

In La Caada Flintridge, California, there is a research facility called JPL that conducts missions for Earth and space science. Among other noteworthy accomplishments, the US developed the first interplanetary spacecraft, the first Earth-orbiting science satellite, and sent robots to other planets.

Governed by Caltech for NASA, JPL is a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC). Compared to the other NASA centers, this places JPL in a unique position because it enables JPL to promote innovation outside the purview of NASA. When you work at JPL, you are a private Caltech employee rather than a civil servant.

JPL’s history is really fascinating, so I urge you to learn more about it.

There is a breadth of work being done here. It includes everything from graphic design, AI, mixed reality, and origami. To work here, you don’t need to be a rocket scientist. I recently had the pleasure of meeting Elizabeth Landau, who holds the title of “Senior Storyteller.”

The remainder of this article will be written from a frontend engineer’s perspective.

Missions at JPL can be compared to products at conventional tech companies. Missions go through a product lifecycle from ideation to implementation. Each mission will have specific requirements that custom services can handle or can extend to other missions. More multi-mission services are currently being developed, which can save current and future missions a lot of time by eliminating the need to reimplement and test shared services.

Many additional tools that were not mentioned above are being used throughout the lab. The team dynamics here are fantastic because you can use X tool if you can convince others of its value.

You join a team for a specific purpose when you join JPL. There are teams for artificial intelligence, user interfaces, and data services, for instance. Members of these teams are then recruited for missions. You can devote all of your time as an individual contributor to one mission or divide it up among several.

Switching teams/missions is pretty straightforward. Meeting team leaders or project managers for missions is possible. Once you’ve located a willing team or mission, you can coordinate with your current responsibilities for a seamless handoff.

You may be seated in individual offices, cubicles, or open-space areas depending on the team you are on.

The lab has tons of clubs for all interests. The wellness club, bike club, and gardening club are a few of my favorites.

There isnt a uniform interview process at JPL. If a team really likes you, they may hire you right away. Below is the suggested process:

Working here has been a blast (no pun intended). The lab encourages you to meet people by pairing up people every two weeks to go out for coffee. The people are brilliant, and meeting new people is as easy as sending a Slack message. Working here is undoubtedly different from working at a big tech company, but the difference you make is felt all the way up in space.

It’s an exciting time for the lab as the Mars 2020 rover is being built here; if you happen to be in Southern California and would like to check out the lab, feel free to get in touch with me. I dont work here anymore.

Interview with Jim Montgomery of NASA Jet Propulsion Lab

Interviews for Top Jobs at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Senior Science Writer Interview

Application

I applied online. I interviewed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Aug 2022

Interview

Did a 30-minute initial phone interview with HR rep. Interviewer was friendly and answered any questions I had. Unfortunately, I was unable to move forward in the process because relocation to Pasadena was required, which I could not do.

Interview Questions

  • Tell me about your science writing experience and background.

Communications Interview

Application

I applied online. The process took 4 weeks. I interviewed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Los Angeles, CA)

Interview

Outstanding recruiter who stayed proactive throughout the process. Five interviews over four weeks:Recruiter, HM, Person who last held the role, Subject area program manager + HR rep, comms leadership. Very standard interview questions on behavior, past accomplishments, and vision for the role.

Interview Questions

  • Tell us about a time when you had a heated disagreement with a manager.

SWE Intern Interview

ApplicationI applied online. In August 2022, I attended an interview at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The interview lasted one round and lasted 60 minutes. Random technical questions but no coding was involved. The team I would be working with was there, and they were bombarding me with inquiries like, “Do you know what an HTTP request is?”

You’ll stand out from the competition and have the best chance of landing the job if you are prepared for these kinds of questions.

Example: “At my previous job as a software engineer, we had a client who needed us to build them a new website. They wanted us to use a different coding language than what we typically used, which was the only issue. This meant that before we could begin developing their website, our team would need to learn a new coding language. We chose to divide into groups, with each group concentrating on learning a particular component of the new coding language. We reunited after learning the fundamentals to begin building the website. ”.

What knowledge do you have of the history of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory? What do you believe to be the most significant component of the work carried out at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory?

When interviewing for a position at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, you can anticipate questions that are particular to the organization and its goals. This is your chance to demonstrate that you possess the abilities and understanding required to work successfully at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The purpose of this question is to gauge your interest in the job and see if you are available to start working right away. It’s crucial to let the interviewer know if you have any other commitments that would prevent you from beginning on time so they can make alternative arrangements.

There is a lot of discussion about what it’s like to work at large tech firms, but not much is said about hidden gems like NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Most people swoon over the prospect of working for a company because of the “amazing” perks they offer, like free food and ping pong tables. People work at NASA JPL because they are genuinely passionate about understanding what is happening in space and on Earth, not because of the benefits. This results in a culture that prioritizes ingenuity and exploration.

You join a team for a specific purpose when you join JPL. There are teams for artificial intelligence, user interfaces, and data services, for instance. Members of these teams are then recruited for missions. You can devote all of your time as an individual contributor to one mission or divide it up among several.

Switching teams/missions is pretty straightforward. Meeting team leaders or project managers for missions is possible. Once you’ve located a willing team or mission, you can coordinate with your current responsibilities for a seamless handoff.

Working here has been a blast (no pun intended). The lab encourages you to meet people by pairing up people every two weeks to go out for coffee. The people are brilliant, and meeting new people is as easy as sending a Slack message. Working here is undoubtedly different from working at a big tech company, but the difference you make is felt all the way up in space.

You may be seated in individual offices, cubicles, or open-space areas depending on the team you are on.

FAQ

Is it hard to get into JPL?

The world population is about 7 billion. But to make the math simpler, round that to 5 billion. Accordingly, there is a one in a million chance that a person you choose at random will work for JPL.

How long is JPL hiring process?

When taking into account 286 user-submitted interviews for all job titles, the hiring process at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory takes an average of 36 days.

What happens at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory?

In the universe, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory occupies a special position. We are a pioneer in robotic space exploration, launching satellites to learn more about our planet and sending rovers to Mars and the outermost reaches of the solar system.

Why do you want to work at JPL?

Well structured and exciting. JPL is a place you definitely want to work. A fun environment to work in, plenty of room for growth, and very exciting tasks to complete Workplace is very open for all types of people.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *