pre disciplinary interview questions

5. You have repeatedly refused overtime assignments and have left the building. This was a violation of a directive given by your supervisor. When you accepted the job, you were informed that overtime on short notice is a requirement when the company faces deadlines serving our customers. “Why do you refuse your supervisor’s directives?”

Some examples of introductory questions include:
  • Do you know why you’re here today?
  • Were you given written notice of this interview?
  • Were you given proper time to prepare for this interview?
  • Are you aware this behavior is unacceptable?
  • Do you understand the potential disciplinary actions for your behavior?

Formal disciplinary meetings – opening the meeting

5. You have repeatedly refused overtime assignments and have left the building. This was a violation of a directive given by your supervisor. When you accepted the job, you were informed that overtime on short notice is a requirement when the company faces deadlines serving our customers. “Why do you refuse your supervisor’s directives?”

If they don’t, a note should be kept of their answer and, where necessary, an explanation should be given. In some cases, an adjournment may be necessary, e.g. if the employee hasn’t received details of the allegations in writing/copies of evidence, or they weren’t informed that they had a statutory right to be accompanied.

Tip. As well as the chairperson taking notes, the content of a disciplinary hearing should be minuted (see The next step ). A separate note taker can be present for these purposes but they should be subject to strict confidentiality requirements. The chairperson should ask the employee if they: know why the disciplinary hearing is taking place; have received details of the allegations in writing; understand the allegations; and are aware that a disciplinary sanction could be imposed. This will help demonstrate that a fair and reasonable procedure was followed.

After the supervisor determines what actually happened, he should also consider any mitigating factors such as length of service or unclear instructions, and any aggravating factors such as a past history of misconduct. The final decision on disciplinary action is usually based on the severity of the misconduct in the context of any aggravating or mitigating factors, and the investigation interview questions and answers results.

Whether the employee is a union member or not, the purpose of pre-disciplinary interview questions is to determine if misconduct occurred and what should be done about it if it did. Misconduct can range from minor offenses, such as being late to work, to more significant problems, such as falling asleep at work or being verbally abusive, and to serious offenses such as violence or drug use.

When an employer suspects some type of employee misconduct has occurred, the typical first step is to conduct an investigation and find out the facts. This can include interviewing other employees who may have witnessed the misconduct, checking the employees file to see if there is a history of misconduct, checking any records of similar incidents to determine how they were dealt with, and interviewing the employee suspected of the misconduct. If this interview is for the purpose of deciding on the appropriate disciplinary action, it is considered a pre-disciplinary interview.

The employer does not have to tell the employee about his Weingarten rights, and Weingarten rights apply to pre-disciplinary interviews only. If the manager has already decided what disciplinary action to take and the purpose of the discussion is not to ask questions but only to inform the employee of the disciplinary action, Weingarten rights do not apply.

A pre-disciplinary interview is an interview conducted with an employee by a supervisor prior to issuing a verbal or written warning, a suspension or termination of employment. For the employer, the pre-disciplinary interview is a tool for finding out what really happened and determining an appropriate response. For the employee, the pre-disciplinary interview is an opportunity to learn potential disciplinary interview questions and answers, give his side of the story and present any mitigating factors.

FAQ

What is a pre-disciplinary interview?

A pre-disciplinary interview is an interview conducted with an employee by a supervisor prior to issuing a verbal or written warning, a suspension or termination of employment. For the employer, the pre-disciplinary interview is a tool for finding out what really happened and determining an appropriate response.

What questions do you ask in a disciplinary?

The first questions to ask at a disciplinary hearing
  • do you know why this disciplinary hearing is taking place?
  • have you received details of the allegations in writing?
  • do you understand the nature of the allegations which have been made against you?
  • have you been given access to the company’s disciplinary procedure?

What are the 4 stages of disciplinary action?

Describe your discipline philosophy.

Provide a clear and concise statement and back it up with examples. Example interview answer: “The purpose of discipline is to facilitate learning and foster better relationships and respect between the students.

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