executive mba interview questions

The interview is a key component of your overall executive MBA application. It provides you with another channel to demonstrate how your background and experience has prepared you to contribute to the program, and allows you to share much more information than your resume and essays.

– Why the EMBA and what led you to make the decision about attending business school at this time? – How will the EMBA assist you in achieving your short and long term goals? – What are you looking to get out of the program? – Tell us about your work experience and how an MBA will fit with plans for the future?

Barbara Craft, Director of Admissions

Campus: San Francisco

Don’t come to the interview with basic questions that can be answered easily on our website. This is not the place to be asking about how long the program is or where students stay. You should have thoughtful questions that pertain to your situation or about the Wharton experience as it relates specifically to you.

The interview is a two-way conversation. It’s a time for you to ask questions, but also for us to find out more about you as a person. We ask questions that help us understand your journey and how you got to where you are and where you see yourself going forward.

Students learn as much from each other as they do from professors in this program so we want people here who like to learn and want to help others learn too. We’re trying to determine if someone is a good fit for this program and if the program is a good fit for them.

Diane Sharp, Director of Admissions

Campus: Philadelphia

Your application does not need to be complete to interview. However, we do prefer that you’ve taken steps toward admission, such as started an application, attended an information event, or started preparing for the GMAT or GRE — in other words, you should be able to demonstrate that you are familiar with the admissions process.

The interview is a one-on-one discussion with a member of the Admissions Committee and is an opportunity to share the kinds of things that may not come across on paper. It’s also an opportunity to discuss if you have the background and qualifications to be a competitive candidate.

We see a lot of energy and interest around working in startups and innovative spaces. That is part of being in the Bay Area because it’s an element of the business energy here. And while we do have students from traditional sectors like pharmaceuticals, healthcare and banking, those numbers are lower here than on the East Coast. We tend to have more students from areas like technology, entertainment, energy and entrepreneurship.

I also coach applicants to do the prep work necessary to get back into the mindset of being a student. That could be an online course or a night class. They need to get ready to do homework and a lot more reading. The farther out of school they are, the more helpful this is.

Of course they should prepare for the GMAT, but I also recommend focusing on the essays. The essays should be authentic. It’s a chance to tell their story, highlight what’s important to them, and explain how a Wharton MBA will help them achieve their goals. There is no right answer, but applicants should have someone else review their essay like a partner, colleague, or friend. The essay is a critical part of the application.

The EMBA Council was created 30+ years ago to serve the growing market of executive MBA programs. The goal is for schools to work together to ensure high standards. We share knowledge and information for the benefit of students. Through its programs and services, the Executive MBA Council advances executive education worldwide.

Beyond entrepreneurship, our students organize other conferences too, including social impact, VC, and energy. And we work with alumni groups to hold events on campus like the Wharton Aerospace Conference. We’re always trying to do more in the community. We aren’t going anywhere, so the more we can become members of the San Francisco community, the better it is for Wharton.

The interview is a key component of your overall executive MBA application. It provides you with another channel to demonstrate how your background and experience has prepared you to contribute to the program, and allows you to share much more information than your resume and essays.

If you can self-identify a weakness (e.g. fewer years of work experience, low test scores, etc.), think about your action plan to enter the program as prepared as possible. You may want to consider things such as shadowing a senior leader for a few days or taking self-study courses in specific areas.

FAQ

How do I prepare for an EMBA interview?

Top 10 Interview Tips for Graduate School Students Considering an EMBA
  1. Have a good understanding of the program. …
  2. Expect questions. …
  3. It’s about fit. …
  4. Schedule an interview as soon as you can. …
  5. Treat it like a job interview. …
  6. Observe a class. …
  7. Talk to students. …
  8. Enjoy the interview.

What questions should I ask in an MBA interview?

Common MBA Interview Questions
  • Tell me about yourself. …
  • Why do you want to receive an MBA? …
  • Why are you interested in this school or program? …
  • What has been your most challenging or rewarding academic experience so far? …
  • Discuss a time when you were a leader. …
  • What do you like most about your current work?

Is Executive MBA easier than MBA?

EMBA classes tend to be more intensive than MBA classes for two reasons: (1) the condensed structure means more information is packed into each class, and (2) EMBA candidates typically enter their programs with significantly more work experience, naturally generating higher-level class discussions.

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